Sunday, March 22, 2009

Step-by-step Crocheted Socks Tutorial

Crochet these socks with fingering weight sock yarn from the toes up. The toe and heel are worked in single crochet, the foot and leg in a grit stitch pattern. The heel is made using the short-row method, with a little trick to eliminate the "hole" that sometimes results where the heel and leg rows come together. I've added a link to a tutorial by Lyn at Shepherd's Crook Crochet on how to do an afterthought heel, which you can try if the short row method doesn't appeal to you. The socks are fitted as you go. The cuff can be finished with a crocheted "ribbing" or you can opt for a pretty shell edging. The numbers given in the pattern are from my personal socks (shoe size 8.5 wide) with suggestions for tailoring to your own size. These instructions are written using American crochet terminology. You can click on the photos to view a larger image.

Materials : -approximately 100 gm fingering weight sock yarn
-size D crochet hook

-2 stitch markers or small pieces of contrasting yarn (optional)
-1 large safety pin or stitch holder

Abbreviations: ch = chain
sc = single crochet
dc = double crochet

rnd = round
st = stitch
yo = yarn over
dec = decrease
inc = increase
fpdc = front post double crochet (not as scary as it sounds!)

Stitches used: -slip knot to start chain
-foundation chain
-single crochet

-grit stitch (sc, dc in same sp)
-front post double crochet ribbing (alt dc and fpdc)
***OR***
-shell (5 dc in same sp)

Gauge: 8 sc = 1"; 8 rows sc = 1"

***FOR BEST RESULTS, PLEASE CHECK YOUR GAUGE!!***

If your 8 rows of 8 sc are less than 1”, try hook size E or loosen your hand's tension on the yarn

If your 8 rows of 8 sc are more than 1”, try hook size C or tighten your hand's tension on the yarn

IMPORTANT NOTES: Please try making both socks at once. In this pattern, you'll be instructed in making socks section by section. So, make a right toe and then a left toe, then add the foot sections to each toe, and so on. This is especially important if you modify the pattern at all... you'll be much less likely to forget the changes you made. Plus, you'll learn the techniques better, and you'll be more likely to end up with a finished pair! If you're working with two 50-gm skeins of yarn it's pretty easy to work one sock from one skein and the second sock from the other. If you have one 100-gm skein, you can wind the skein into a ball, then wind another ball from the first until they're about the same size. If you're using self-striping yarn, you might want to make sure that the yarn's color changes are in the same order and starting with the same color on both balls or skeins, so that your finished socks will match.


ABOUT SOCK YARN: If this is your very first pair of crocheted socks, you might want to use a less expensive yarn. That's a good idea, but PLEASE make a gauge swatch! This pattern was created for fingering weight sock yarn. If you're not familiar with sock yarns, visit your local yarn shop and ask about them. If you're on Ravelry, you can find tons of information about the different kinds of sock yarns available. The websites of many yarn manufacturers are another good source of information. There are so many options, it can be difficult to make a selection. If you are not allergic to wool, I recommend a superwash wool and nylon blend yarn for your first pair of socks.
The finished socks in the title photograph were made with JL Virgo yarn (75% superwash wool, 25% nylon, color 604). The bright multi-color sock yarn used for some of the illustrations is JL Alya (48% cotton, 39% merino, 13% nylon, color 702). The fall-colors yarn used for illustrating many of the steps is a worsted weight nylon yarn of unknown manufacture (from a thrift shop). THIS TYPE OF YARN IS NOT RECOMMENDED FOR SOCKS; it just made clearer pictures for this tutorial.

All that being said, let's get started...

TOE SECTION

Make a slip knot,




then ch 7.



ROUND 1

Look at your chain. One side looks like flat interlocking loops.





On the other side you can see "humps" that go between the interlocking loops.


Insert hook into the 2nd "hump" from hook.

Make 2 sc in this hump,

then 1 sc in each of the next 4 humps,

then 2 sc in the last hump.

Now turn the chain around so you can work the next stitches into the interlocking loops.

Skip over the loop closest to the hook (you already worked 2 sc into the other side of this loop),

and make 1 sc in each of the next 4 chains. You now have 12 sc. If you lay the "tail" across the loops, you can crochet over it now instead of weaving it in later. From here on, you'll work in rounds. The rounds are worked in a spiral and NOT joined with a slip stitch.

ROUND 2

If you're not sure where to start this round, count backwards from the sc right behind the hook. The 12th sc from the hook, counting backwards, is the right one even though it may not look like the right one. Make 2 sc into this sc. If you like, you may put a stitch marker or a small piece of contrasting yarn into the first sc so you can be sure your rounds are correct.

Make 2 sc into each of the next 2 sc.

sc in each of the next 4 sc. Be careful not to miss a stitch! It is especially easy to miss the space for the sc that follows the increase.

2 sc in each of the next 2 sc. (text error in photo, sorry)

sc in each of the next 4 sc.
You should be back to your marker, if you used one. This round has 16 sc. From here, the rounds will continue to increase at the sides. Some crocheters find it helpful to put a marker at each side to make sure that the increases are in the right place. I usually just count.

ROUND 3

sc in next sc.
2 sc in each of the next 2 sc.
sc in each of the next 6 sc.
2 sc in each of the next 2 sc.

sc in each of the next 5 sc. (20 sc in round)

Your work should be starting to “cup” at both sides now, looking a little like an oblong basket. I prefer to work around the outside of the “basket”, and have poked the center of the work so that it goes that way (see photos).

ROUND 4

sc in each of the next 2 sc.
2 sc in each of the next 2 sc.
sc in each of the next 8 sc.
2 sc in each of the next 2 sc.
sc in each of the next 6 sc. (24 sc in round)

ROUND 5

sc in each of the next 3 sc.
2 sc in each of the next 2 sc.

sc in each of the next 10 sc.
2 sc in each of the next 2 sc.
sc in each of the next 7 sc. (28 sc in round)



Your work should be looking like a little basket by now. It's okay if it tries to twist and doesn't look like my photos... I stretched and flattened the work for the pictures. When the socks are finished, the twisting can be eliminated by "blocking" (explained at the end of the project), but I've found this isn't really necessary. After the socks are worn and laundered, the twisting seems to disappear on its own.

ROUND 6

sc in each of the next 4 sc.

2 sc in each of the next 2 sc.

sc in each of the next 12 sc.

2 sc in each of the next 2 sc.

sc in each of the next 8 sc. (32 sc in round)




ROUND 7

sc in each of the next 5 sc.
2 sc in each of the next 2 sc.
sc in each of the next 14 sc.
2 sc in each of the next 2 sc.

sc in each of the next 9 sc. (36 sc in round)

ROUND 8

sc in each of the next 6 sc.
2 sc in each of the next 2 sc.
sc in each of the next 16 sc.
2 sc in each of the next 2 sc.
sc in each of the next 10 sc. (40 sc in round)

ROUND 9

sc in each of the next 7 sc.
2 sc in each of the next 2 sc.
sc in each of the next 18 sc.
2 sc in each of the next 2 sc.
sc in each of the next 11 sc. (44 sc in round)

ROUND 10

sc in each of the next 8 sc.
2 sc in each of the next 2 sc.
sc in each of the next 20 sc.
2 sc in each of the next 2 sc.
sc in each of the next 12 sc. (48 sc in round)

ROUND 11

sc in each of the next 9 sc.
2 sc in each of the next 2 sc.
sc in each of the next 22 sc.
2 sc in each of the next 2 sc.
sc in each of the next 13 sc. (52 sc in round)

ROUNDS 12 - 18

Work these 7 rounds without increases: sc in each sc around (52 sc in each round). If you use a stitch marker in the first stitch of the round, you only have to count rounds and not stitches.

Try the toe on your foot. If you want this toe section longer, just add more sc rounds without increases until the toe section is the size you want it to be.

Pull the last loop out and secure it with a large safety pin or a stitch holder. With your second skein or ball of yarn, make another toe section to match the first one.

At this point, go ahead and sc in each sc until you reach the side. (By "side", I mean where the fold is when the toe section is folded flat... see picture below.)

Now that you have finished two sock toe sections, you're ready to start the...

FOOT SECTION

As in the toe section, the foot section is worked in rounds without joining or turning. Counting stitches or rows is not necessary.

Here we begin working in the grit stitch pattern

Round 1

sc and dc in next sc (grit stitch made)


*skip next sc, sc and dc in next sc*

repeat from * to * until you get back to the beginning of the round.

Round 2

*sc and dc into the sc of the grit stitch in the previous round; skip the dc of the grit stitch in the previous round*



repeat from * to * for a few rounds.


Try on the sock.

The foot section will stop when it reaches the ankle joint. Most feet are narrower in some parts and wider in others. If you'd like a well-fitting sock, you can widen your work with increases and narrow it with decreases. I usually like 1 or 2 decrease rounds at the instep (so the sock doesn't sag there) and two increase rounds near the ankle (to make it easier to put the sock on without stretching and straining the yarn). Crocheted socks aren't quite as stretchy as knitted socks, and you should put them on and take them off carefully. If you're using a yarn with elastic in it, this will be less of an issue, but still something to consider.

When you get to a place on your foot where you'd like the sock to be wider, you'll need to know HOW TO INCREASE THE GRIT STITCH ROUNDS:

Fold the sock flat and place markers at the sides if you like. Continue grit stitch pattern until you reach the marker (or fold).

At this spot, make an extra grit stitch into the dc of the grit stitch of the previous row, then resume the grit stitch pattern in the next sc. The increase is just 3 grit stitches where you would normally have only 2.

Repeat the increase of the extra grit stitch at the marker (or fold) at the other side. Then continue in normal pattern (grit stitch in each sc of previous round) at least one full time around. Try on your sock again to see if you need additional increase rounds.

When you get to a place on your foot where you'd like the sock to be narrower, you'll need to know HOW TO MAKE DECREASE ROUNDS:

You make decreases at the side points (as described in increase section).


Make an sc in the next sc (as if you were going to make a regular grit stitch)

yo; insert hook into next dc; draw up a loop;

yo; draw loop through 2 of the loops on the hook;

yo; insert hook into next sc; draw up a loop;

yo; draw a loop through 2 of the loops on the hook;

yo; draw a loop through all of the loops on the hook; dec made.

Then resume your pattern until you reach the other side point.

Repeat the decrease at the marker (or fold) at the other side. Then continue in normal pattern (grit stitch in each sc of previous round) at least one full time around. Try on your sock again to see if you need additional decrease rounds.

Continue making rounds in grit stitch pattern, trying on socks every now and then and making increase or decrease rounds as needed. When the sock reaches the base of the ankle joint (about 2 inches from the pointy-est spot of the ankle), this section is finished. Make sure you end up as near as possible to the side point. Secure your working loop with a safety pin or stitch holder and complete the foot section of the other sock. It's a good idea to write down where you've made inc or dec rows. The rows of grit stitches are pretty easy to count.

When you're all done with both foot sections, it's time to begin:

THE HEEL

Many crochet sock patterns become confusing at this point. I've tried several methods of crocheting the heel section, and find that the "short rowed" method is the easy and fits well. The following instructions and photos will hopefully help to make this easy for you. If the short row method isn't working for you, try at the afterthought heel method tutorial by Shepherd's Crook HERE .


TO START THE HEEL: The last round of grit stitches on the foot section needs to end at the side point. This is where we will start the heel. You should have between 28 and 30 grit stitches in the last round of the foot section.






Row 1: (If you have 28 grit stitches in the last round of the foot section, skip one stitch before starting this row. If you have 29 or 30 grit stitches, don't skip but start your row in the very next stitch.) Okay, sc in the next 29 sts. Ch 1, turn.

Row 2: sc in the same st as ch and in the next 27 sts (28 sc). Leave last st unworked! Ch 1, turn.

Row 3: sc in the same st as ch and in the next 26 sts (27 sc). Leave last st unworked! Ch 1, turn.

Row 4: sc in the same st as ch and in the next 25 sts (26 sc). Leave last st unworked! Ch 1, turn.

Row 5: sc in the same st as ch and in the next 24 sts (25 sc). Leave last st unworked! Ch 1, turn.

Row 6: sc in the same st as ch and in the next 23 sts (24 sc). Leave last st unworked! Ch 1, turn.

Row 7: sc in the same st as ch and in the next 22 sts (23 sc). Leave last st unworked! Ch 1, turn.

Row 8: sc in the same st as ch and in the next 21 sts (22 sc). Leave last st unworked! Ch 1, turn.

Row 9: sc in the same st as ch and in the next 20 sts (21 sc). Leave last st unworked! Ch 1, turn.

Row 10: sc in the same st as ch and in the next 19 sts (20 sc). Leave last st unworked! Ch 1, turn.

Row 11: sc in the same st as ch and in the next 18 sts (19 sc). Leave last st unworked! Ch 1, turn.

Row 12: sc in the same st as ch and in the next 17 sts (18 sc). Leave last st unworked! Ch 1, turn.

Row 13: sc in the same st as ch and in the next 16 sts (17 sc). Leave last st unworked! Ch 1, turn.

Row 14: sc in the same st as ch and in the next 15 sts (16 sc). Leave last st unworked! Ch 1, turn.

When completed, this part of the heel looks like this:

Nothing very difficult about that. Now we do what's called the "heel turn". It isn't very hard either, but you do have to pay attention to where you're inserting your hook. What we want to do is make a sort of pocket-looking thing to cup around the heel. When finished, it looks like this:

Row 1: sc in next 16 sts. Insert hook in SIDE like this:

yo, draw up a loop. Keeping those 2 loops on hook, insert hook in unworked st below like this:








yo, draw up a loop, yo and draw a loop through all 3 loops on the hook (dec made):

Ch 1, turn.

***Note: the process I am calling a decrease (dec) is sometimes called sc2tog or scdec.***

Row 2: sc in 17 sts across. (ch 1 does not count as a sc from here on) Dec over the side and unworked st below, as in Row 1. Ch 1, turn.

Row 3: sc in 18 sc across. Dec over the long side as follows. Insert hook into upper half of the side:

yo, draw up a loop. Insert hook into lower half of the long side:

yo, pull up another loop (3 loops on hook):









yo, pull loop through all 3 loops on hook (dec made). Now, make a slip stitch into the unworked stitch below where you are now.

Ch 1, turn.

Row 4: (skip sl st just made) sc in dec and next 18 sts. Dec over long side. Sl st in unworked st below. Ch 1, turn.

Row 5: (skip sl st just made) sc in dec and next 19 sts. Dec over long side. Sl st in unworked st below. Ch 1, turn.

Row 6: (skip sl st just made) sc in dec and next 20 sts. Dec over long side. Sl st in unworked st below. Ch 1, turn.

Row 7: (skip sl st just made) sc in dec and next 21 sts. Dec over long side. Sl st in unworked st below. Ch 1, turn.

Row 8: (skip sl st just made) sc in dec and next 22 sts. Dec over long side. Sl st in unworked st below. Ch 1, turn.

Row 9: (skip sl st just made) sc in dec and next 23 sts. Dec over long side. Sl st in unworked st below. Ch 1, turn.

Row 10: (skip sl st just made) sc in dec and next 24 sts. Dec over long side. Sl st in unworked st below. Ch 1, turn.

Row 11: (skip sl st just made) sc in dec and next 25 sts. Dec over long side. Sl st in unworked st below. Ch 1, turn.

Row 12: (skip sl st just made) sc in dec and next 25 sts. Dec over the next sc and upper portion of the long side. Dec over the lower portion of the long side and the unworked stitch below. Ch 1, turn.

Row 13: Dec over the 1st two sts; sc in the next 26 sts; dec over the lower part of the side and the st on the foot section where the sc for Row 1 of the heel was made. Ch 1, turn.

Row 14: sc in the next 27 sts; dec over the next st and the upper part of the side; dec over the lower part of the side and the st on the foot section where the sc for Row 1 of the heel was made.

And the heel is finished! There, now, that wasn't so bad. Make a heel on your other sock before beginning the...

LEG

All right, we're almost done! Starting from last sc of heel:

Round 1: Ch 1, turn. Grit st (sc,dc) in 1st sc of heel, Repeat < > to end of heel. To avoid leaving a "hole" at the place where the heel and foot sections come together, make a grit st right in that junction...


... and then continue the grit st pattern as in the foot section..


...until you get to the "V" shaped foot/heel junction on the other side. Fill in the "V" with a grit st just like on the other side.

Round 2: Grit st in every grit st of the previous round. This does make an increase. That's okay, it's good to have a little extra room here for putting on the sock without stretching it too much.

Rounds 3 and 4: Grit st in every grit st of the previous round. Try on the sock. You will likely need to make decreases or increases to shape around the ankle. Try on your socks every 4 rounds or so from here on.

Rounds 5 and up: Continue in grit st pattern, shaping with incs and decs as you like, until leg reaches desired length or you're getting close to the end of your yarn. You'll need to have a few yards left for the cuff.

CUFF SECTION

(If you need more help with fpdc and bpdc, there is an instructive video on how to do them at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kYJs42RUfuc )

At the end of the leg section, JOIN the last dc of the last grit st to the next sc of the previous round with a sl st.

Round 1: Ch 3 (counts as dc here and throughout), and dc in ea st all the way around. Join last dc to top of ch3 with a sl st. You should have an EVEN number of stitches. DO NOT TURN.

Round 2: Ch 3; * fpdc around next st; bpdc around next st *. Repeat from * to * all the way around. Join last dc to top of ch3 with a sl st. DO NOT TURN.

Round 3 and up: Ch 3, fpdc around each fpdc, and bpdc in each bpdc of previous round, all the way around. Join last dc to top of ch3 with a sl st. DO NOT TURN. When you have done enough rounds to look good (or you run out of yarn), finish off. Weave in the loose end and you are finished!


12 comments:

Sandylp said...

Thank you for the pictures and step by step instructions. Is there a heel section?

momtomany said...

I need help on the heel part, I have 36 stitches instead of the called for 28-30

innerbanks said...

You can work the heel on any number of stitches. Just keep decreasing at the end of every row by leaving off the last stitch. Use the same number of rows as in the pattern.

Krafty Thoughts said...

I love the tutorial but the images make your beautiful knit work washed out, and the wrinkles in the cloth kinda detract from the focus as well. Perhaps taking the photos in natural light might keep the images from being washed out? And you can always use Photoshop to get rid of the wrinkles. I wrote a post on it to show how:

http://www.kraftythoughts.com/2009/11/diy-fixing-backgrounds.html

Hope it helps!

Coryn said...

This is a brilliant tutorial! I would have been happy to pay for this as a download ie on Ravelry.

Many thanks for your work and taking the time to do this.

Coryn said...

This is a brilliant tutorial! I would have been happy to pay for this as a download ie on Ravelry.

Many thanks for your work and taking the time to do this.

Jane D. said...

You have enabled me to do my first ever sock - now just need to make it a partner!

Gloris said...

te agradezco mucho este tutorial, la explicación y el paso a paso son geniales, a pesar de no entender muy bien tu idioma, lo entendí y pude hacer las medias que había querido hacer con una sola aguja.

Gloris said...

te agradezco mucho este tutorial, la explicación y el paso a paso son geniales, a pesar de no entender muy bien tu idioma, lo entendí y pude hacer las medias que había querido hacer con una sola aguja.

Gloris said...

te agradezco mucho este tutorial, la explicación y el paso a paso son geniales, a pesar de no entender muy bien tu idioma, pude hacer las medias que había querido hacer con una sola aguja.

Jane Mccord said...

excellent tutorial thank you very much

Jane Mccord said...

excellent tutorial thank you very much